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A Timeless Tale for Children and Adults Alike

In Books, Children's Books, Mungai and the Goa Constrictor, Teen Fiction, Young Adult Fiction on September 2, 2012 at 12:01 am

Told through the eyes of animals, Mungai and the Goa Constrictor promotes tolerance, peace and harmony, and illustrates how easily seemingly incompatible creatures, drawn together from vastly different environments, with Mungai and the Goa Constrictor by Amelia Curzon - Book coverperceptions of life that are poles apart, can unite in a common cause – to overcome fear and oppression.  And guess what!

Well, that would be spoiling it, wouldn’t it!

But, let me tell you just a little bit more about the story……

Mungai, a plausible and resourceful creature of indeterminate origin, and with a penchant for easy living, finds a soul mate in Goa; a lisping, greedy, self-serving  Boa Constrictor. Having explained to her ‘the usefulness of the lesser species’ and his highly profitable master plan to find ways of passing through life without too much cost to himself and as little effort as possible, and at the expense of others  not as strong-minded or as clever as he is, Mungai soft-soaps Goa into joining him in his venture.  Captivated by Mungai’s way of thinking, Goa conspires with him to go in search of ………

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Read an excerpt from Mungai and the Goa Constrictor

“Truly, Curzon crafts an unforgettable story that speaks to the soul” – Claudia Moss (USA)  Reviews 5*****

Whilst the apes were trying to swing after him at the same speed, Gerald had an unfortunate accident.

He collided with a rather large, and not very friendly beast that, like Mungai, was of dubious origin. The beast had been asleep in the branches at the time, and was non too pleased by this unwanted intrusion into his dreams. He reared up on his hind legs, delicately balancing himself on the thinnest of branches, and lunged for Gerald.

“He looks like a monkey-meat lover,” thought Gerald, but he was frozen to the spot and could only think of his imminent death, followed by a prestigious military funeral, he hoped, for his few remains.

The unidentifiable creature grabbed Gerald by the feet, and swung him round and round above his head, and then hurled him skywards towards the canopy roof, where he became stuck between two branches. He was so far up, the others lost sight of him. On his own, with no-one to help him, he thought immediately of his ‘military training’ and decided to bring in the ‘vacate the high location’ manoeuvre. This manoeuvre was something only to be used in emergency situations, which he quite rightly deemed this was. He did not have much time, so he started straight away tearing off branches and bits of other vegetation, and weaving them together securely. He kept doing this until he had a large piece, three times his own size. He took one corner in each claw, and let himself fall backwards, down from the top. It was a very crowded tree. The growth from top to bottom was extremely dense. It cannot be said he sailed down from above, more bounced than anything. He bounced and he bounced and he bounced. From one branch to the other…sideways, backwards and forwards. Hanging upside down, he could not see where he was going. It was like blindfolded skydiving with obstacles. Much to his surprise, he found the jungle floor. It was not a soft landing.

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  1. [...] Mungai and the Goa Constrictor by Amelia Curzon (ameliacurzonblogger.wordpress.com) [...]

  2. I loved this story and can’t stop thinking about it. In so many ways it parallels the fundamental theme of my book, The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap, with the characters, metaphors for good and evil, playing out their stories, in conflict, and pulling the reader in through like emotions. There’s something about a good parable, an animated story that is not an exact duplicate of reality, that speaks to the reader to help “us” see our own insides, and hopefully grow and cast off shadow issues. It is a simple story, a deep story, an easy to read-hard-to-put-down-story, that leaves Mungai and Goa, along with the brilliant cast of characters, dancing in your head long after it’s been read.
    Paulette Mahurin

    • Thank you so much, Paulette, for your wonderful words. I must agree our two books do seem to have a great deal in common. I would also like to think ‘Mungai’ conveys another powerful message to vulnerable young people; ‘beware of predators in the guise of friends’. Although I haven’t read The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap yet, I had heard enough about it to send me scurrying off to the ‘Buy now with 1-Click’ button on Amazon. When it is delivered, which I sincerely hope will be very soon, I shall be straight into it. I am really excited about it. I am sure it will leave the same impression upon me as ‘Mungai’ did upon you.

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